News



IT job seeker tips: 8 IT-specific questions you’ll get asked in job interviews

Published August 16th, 2012 by Mak

We’ve all seen the standard list of interview tips and questions that every employer will ask, like “What are your strengths” and “Describe a situation when…” You’ll always need to describe your skills, education and background, regardless of whether you’re applying to be an accountant or construction worker.

But if you work in the information technology or computer industry, you can expect some IT-specific questions during your job interviews. Be ready to answer these questions with poise, confidence and just the right amount of detail:

Can you take a codility test? Here you’ll need to write actual code in a programming language to confirm you have actual practical programming skills. It’s like a driver’s test — you can’t just tell the interviewer you can parallel park, you have to get behind the wheel and put the car between the cones.

What development tools have you used? Companies want to make sure you’ve got experience using the latest technology. How do you troubleshoot IT issues? This speaks directly to your problem-solving skills in an industry-specific context.

What’s your opinion of on-site vs. cloud solutions? (assuming the applications are functionally equivalent) Your answer demonstrates your knowledge in this emerging field. Form a thoughtful opinion that weighs the pros and cons of both.

What is your production deployment process? Project management has always been a key skill for IT companies — you’ll need have a general framework memorized to let interviewers know that you’ll manage each project thoughtfully and efficiently.

What software vendors have you worked with, and which do you prefer? Every company has its favorite companies it likes to work with, and is always looking to expand their network.

How important is it for you to work directly with users?The answer to this question might indicate how people-friendly you are. Make sure you mention that you’re open to working directly with users, when appropriate.

How do you define documentation? Why is it important? Good documentation is a core skill valued by almost all IT employers, so it’s important that you have a clear answer to this question.

It will help you remember your answers, plus add clarity to your thoughts, if you actually write out your answers to these questions beforehand. Make sure you also ask some questions of your own, and brush up on your communications skills while you’re at it.

Looking for take that next step in your career? Let us help! Comrise’s clients are constantly on the lookout for professionals who can answer the questions above and more. Contact us to learn more.

Questions to Ask About the Company During Interview

Published August 16th, 2012 by Mak

Most people have encountered that awkward moment during the interview where the interviewer asks, “Do you have any questions?” The reason it can be awkward is that if you don’t have any questions, you fear it will look like you haven’t paid attention or you don’t care about the company, and if you do have questions, you worry if they are the right ones to be asking. Use this time to demonstrate that you’ve done your research, you know about the industry, and you’re serious about taking a position with them.

The questions you ask and how you phrase them is a reflection of you, but they can portray a positive and confident image. Remember that the interview isn’t just so they can get to know you, but for you to get to know them. Use this time to determine if the company is one you will want to devote your time to. Here are some great questions to ask during your interview:

  • What are the company’s plan to expand?
  • What is the company’s five year plan, and how does this department fit into that plan?
  • How does the company compare to other industry leaders?
  • What is your management style?
  • What kinds of qualifications would the perfect candidate for this position have?
  • How and by whom will my performance be evaluated?
  • What is the most difficult aspect of this position?
  • What is a typical day for someone in this position?
  • How many people have held this position in the last 5 years? Where are these people now?
  • What kind of upward movement potential does this position and this company offer?

If the position is a management position, you might want to ask some questions about the employees you will manage, here are a few questions to get you started on the types of appropriate questions you can ask:

  • What kind of authority will I hold?
  • How is the current morale of employees and why?
  • Are there any challenging employees?
  • What kind of training issues might I face?
  • Have you already identified employees who should be let go? Is anyone on a discipline plan?

Here are some topics to avoid:

  • Anything to do with salary. The discussion of salary and other benefits will come later when the job offer is extended.
  • Anything that can be completed through a Google search, like company size and history.

By asking intelligent and thoughtful answers, you’ll portray yourself as a serious candidate, who not only researched the company, but desires to know more. For more ways we can help your job search, please contact us today!