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Use Numbers to Quantify Your Value During the Interview

Published May 20th, 2013 by Mak

When interviewing candidates for jobs, employers are interested in two things, according to HR professional and freelance writer Deborah S. Hildebrand: A) Can you do the job? and B) If you can do the job for their organization?

Thus, aside from demonstrating that you have all the requisite talents outlined in the job posting, such as the ability to communicate and required technical skills, candidates should consider using numbers to quantify their value.

In another Hildebrand post, “Use Numbers to Quantify Your Work Experience and Get a Job,” she explains the importance of adding numbers to your resume. Quantifying adds a dimension that helps employers visualize your real value.

According to this CBS Money Watch post, here are a few suggestions on how to “quantify” your resume:

  • Consider the projects you’ve worked on that contributed to the bottom line. For example, Engineers can explain how he or she designed a new app the company took to market or developed a new program to help sales increase revenue.
  • Share examples of when you performed outside the scope of your job. Talk about how you reduce costs by taking on greater responsibilities, or even simply taking on responsibilities of an absent colleague.
  • Talk about what you did to contribute to cost containment. Explain how you used new technology or tools to reduce expenses or improve employee productivity.

The fact is that quantifying this information helps potential employers gain a better understanding of your contributions. For more tips on interviewing and insight into finding the right career opportunity for you, browse our website or contact us.

Starting salaries for app developers will top 80k next year

Published December 13th, 2012 by Mak

Think about the impact that app developers have had on the economy, and you’ll go back to the year 2007 when those spots were non-existent.

But since then, the “app economy” is responsible for almost a half-a-million jobs in the U.S., according to an article in The Seattle Times, “Sizzling mobile-applications industry ready to hire.”

If you’re an entrepreneur with a few apps under your digital belt, you might want to consider pursuing one of these high-paying openings: It’s a “sizzling new industry” in the technologyjob market.

What’s more, over the long haul, these top-paying slots may very well be counted on to add to this country’s exports in the years ahead.

But currently the fear among those who know this industry is that the U.S. is not on a fast track to nurture new talent; consequently, a multitude of unfilled jobs continue to be up for grabs.

Thank the consumer’s hunger for more widgets and gadgets to enlighten their mobile devices for the meteoric rise in salaries.

“Mobile apps developers can expect pay increases of 9 percent next year, among the highest of any jobs, putting them in the range of $92,750 to $133,500 a year, according to a survey that the staffing and consulting firm Robert Half International released last month.”

Graduates from the information-systems program—not app developers—at Mississippi State, are locking in starting salaries from $45,000 to $50,000, while six of the app developers nailed down a starting figure of $80,000; this, after the college revamped their course offerings to include a popular student choice: “Field Studies in iPhone Entrepreneurship.”

If you’re getting ready to cast your resume into the stream of technology jobs, contact us first. We can help get you in front of the right people, not into a black hole filled with hundreds of resumes. We make IT happen for job seekers every day, and we can make IT happen for you!

Comrise Acquires Hong Kong Consulting Firm

Published October 19th, 2012 by Mak

Comrise Inc., a global consulting firm specializing in Managed IT, Big Data and Workforce Solutions, is pleased to announce the acquisition of Essentials Recruitment Consultants Limited, a consulting firm providing recruitment services and temporary staffing solutions to FMCG, marketing and retail clients in Hong Kong.

“Business conditions are very favorable for marketing and retail operations candidates in Hong Kong to work in China,” says Dorothy Fok, General Manager of Essentials. “There is growing demand from luxury markets in China, which require marketing and retail professionals from Hong Kong, to take up these management positions in Beijing and Shanghai, where Comrise also does business.”

Frequently described as a place where “East meets West,” Hong Kong is well known as both a global gateway to China and a window to the Asia Pacific regions. With the acquisition of Essentials, Comrise gains an opportunity to build a stronger bridge between its U.S. and China initiatives.

“Many of our global Fortune 500 companies look to us to provide them with consulting and workforce solutions in Hong Kong, as many of them use the city as their Asia headquarters,” says Sincia Liu, President of Comrise. “As a fast growing company that provides attentive service to its customers, we see a great synergy in joining hands with Essentials to better compete, connect and collaborate within the global marketplace.”

About Comrise:

Established in 1984, Comrise is a global consulting firm with headquarters in the U.S. and China. Our teams specialize in Managed IT, Big Data, and Workforce Solutions – Staff Augmentation, Recruiting, RPO, and Payrolling. With nearly 30 years of experience, Comrise provides local talent and resources on a global scale.

About Essentials:

Established in 2006, ESSENTIALS Recruitment is a contingency recruitment firm with a fast growing presence in Hong Kong. Our core areas of business include executive search and recruitment services. As a total recruitment solutions provider, ESSENTIALS offer services in areas of permanent, contract and temporary placements.

CONTACT:
Steven Grover
Work: 732-739-2330
www.comrise.com

 

IT job interview tips: four things you should not do

Published October 5th, 2012 by Mak

Going for an IT job interview? Here are some job interview tips on what NOT to do from Lisa Vaas, online journalist and former Executive Editor for eWEEK:

No know-it-alls allowed…

Don’t be an arrogant know-it-all. That impression usually comes out by not asking questions during the interview when encouraged to do so. Experienced interviewers evaluate the uninquisitive interviewee as “the wrong kind of thinker,” who shows a lack of curiosity and “a prima donna’s belief” of knowing everything there is to know. Experience with highly skilled people who “know everything” is that they tend to make poor team players.

Lay off techie-talk.

Stay away from acronyms and excessively technical language. Employers want to find out how the IT job applicant can relate to customers and not make people feel like dummies. So the idea is to NOT talk down to the interviewer.

There is no “I” in “team.”

Don’t just talk about yourself. You won’t be impressing anyone just by talking about your accomplishments. What they are looking for is someone who has a track record as a contributing member of a team. You got the interview call on the basis that you are an accomplished professional. It is best to talk more abut the people and teams you worked with and use the plural first person pronouns “we” and “us” in those descriptions.

No bad mouthing ex-coworkers

Don’t ever say disrespectful or harsh things about people you once worked with. You are being judged in large part on your attitude, because poor attitude creates tension and low productivity in any working environment. If you are asked to relate some negative experience with a past coworker do it in a way that shows you learned something about dealing with different personalities.

Recognize possible “people-skill deficits.”

Finally, accept the fact that IT workers can sometimes be not very adept in dealing with people. Dealing with code and compilers, after all, is sometimes a lot easier than having to reason with people. If you recognize that about yourself, do something about it.

In the IT job market and looking for the ideal position with one of our clients (or even us!)? Contact us and check out our job listing.

 

Is Your Technology Hiring Process Screening Out Great Candidates?

Published September 9th, 2012 by Mak

The current wisdom about the job situation in the U.S. is full of contradictions:

  • There are no jobs.
  • There are jobs but no skilled workers.
  • There are skilled workers but they are not qualified for the available jobs.
  • Qualified workers exist for the available jobs but there is a problem with matching up the workers and the jobs.

Why is this happening and how do we fix it?

According to USA Today a study by Beyond.com indicates one problem is the way job descriptions are written, especially for technology hiring. Job descriptions seem to go from one extreme to the other; either they are so vague that job seekers are unable to identify the position or the description contains a lengthy list of specific language or tool experience unlikely to be found in a single individual.

Much of it comes down to poor screening tools with limited options. The software so many companies use to try to screen out unqualified candidates is not very flexible or intuitive. It often runs best on lists of software languages, accounting terms, or systems experience that are not as essential as being able to bring a team together and get a project out on time. But the skills for the latter are difficult to program into the filter.

When the filter is created from these lists it sorts through the incoming applications and weeds out any candidate that does not perfectly match. The longer and more specific the list of requirements, the lower the likelihood of finding a candidate that meets them all. At the end of the process, there is nobody left standing. The hiring manager can’t understand why no candidates are being referred for interview while HR sees plenty of resumes but no one appeared to be qualified.

To correct this problem hiring managers must first determine exactly what skills a position truly requires. Then they can decide which skills could be taught and which skills must be present at the time of hire. Working together with HR and recruiters, a realistic description of these skills can be used to prepare a more effective filter that is capable of screening out truly unqualified applicants and producing a short list of candidates who may not have every skill desired but who may be able to the do the job with some training.

If you are experiencing a similar problem within your organization, connect with your recruiters to ensure that job descriptions are accurate and great candidates are not being missed. To learn more contact us.